ABOUT CAESAR
Caesar Rodney
dirt road

... The district officially came into existence as State Consolidated District No. 1 on July 1, 1915 under the authority of a state consolidation law. Shortly thereafter residents of the area voted 52 to 1 to approve a $12,000 bond to supplement an $18,000 appropriation from the state for the construction of a new school building for grades one through twelve. Not long after that the school board adopted the name of Caesar Rodney for the district and school in honor of the Revolutionary War hero and statesman who had made his home near St. Jones Neck in the eastern part of the county....

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About Caesar Rodney

Caesar Rodney, Delaware's most well known personality, was born near Dover in 1728 and died in Dover in 1784.

Rodney had the distinction of being sheriff of Kent County and the speaker of the Delaware delegation against the unfair actions of the King in 1769. He was also one of the first to publicly speak out for independence.

In early July of 1776 he was in Kent County mustering troops when he learned of the dispute between the other two delegates from Delaware on the vote for independence. George Read was against the declaration, however Thomas McKean was for the split with England and sent Rodney the note that led to his famous ride. Upon receiving McKean's message Rodney immediately headed for Philadelphia, even though his doctor said the ride could kill him. Rodney was in a great deal of pain throughout the ride since he was afflicted with a cancer of the face that had disfigured his features so badly that he was forced to wear a silk veil to prevent upsetting anyone who may have seen him.

Rodney had 80 miles to ride and only a half a day to complete a journey which normally took 30 hours. He arrived just as the voting session was about to begin. When the vote from Delaware was asked for, Read voted nay, McKean voted aye, and Rodney, still in his riding clothes and wearing spurs, rose and said: "As I believe the voice of my constituents and of all sensible and honest men is in favor of independence, my judgement concurs with them; I vote for independence."

Caesar Rodney became the General in charge of the Delaware forces until 1778 when he was elected the first President of Delaware. After his term he was elected as a state legislator and served for two years, until his death from the cancer in 1784 at the age of 56. Caesar Rodney was buried on his farm near Dover. In 1934 Caesar Rodney was chosen to represent Delaware in Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.